What’s Cooking Wednesday: A Party, Gifts, and Restaurant Week

I hosted my first holiday party last weekend and…well, I think I kind of love having parties. There is absolutely, 100%, nothing more satisfying than seeing my friends happy and well-fed in my home.

Party spread, and a tree!

Ready for entertaining!

As for what I made, this was the menu:

  • Smoked salmon
  • Mustard batons (I loved these, they were dead simple and tasted great–I’ll share the recipe soon)
  • French Onion Soup palmiers (puff pastry covered with caramelized onions and gruyere, rolled, and sliced)
  • Gougeres with gruyere (from Dorie Greenspan’s Around My French Table, but you can find the recipe at West of the Loop)
  • Muhammara
  • Mustard (I made three kinds: white wine, hard cider, and blueberry stout)
  • Pickled vegetables
  • Herb marinated olives (from Around My French Table)
  • Baked brie/cheese plate/salami
  • Mulled wine (recipe to come soon)
  • Hot chocolate (from Smitten Kitchen)
  • Damson plum gin (this turned out spectacularly, and went amazingly well with champagne)
  • Cookies (full list in the next post)

Plus the usual bread, crackers, nuts, beer, sparkling wine. It was quite the spread if I do say so myself!

Party spread

In other news, while I didn’t put together a gift guide, the Chicago Food Bloggers saved me the trouble and put together a great one. My fellow foodies gave some awesome suggestions–books, edibles, experiences, gadgets–for just about anyone on your list. If I had remembered to contribute, I would have suggested a cooking class or two at the Peterson Garden Project.

And finally the Chicago Restaurant Week(s) lineup was announced today! These two weeks starting January 30 are great for getting out and trying new places around the city. My favorite discovery from last year was Ada Street and their amazing cocktails, creative (and, more importantly, delicious) small plates, and the most spectacular buttermilk pannacotta. Yum. This year they’re doing a pretty funky menu based on the last meals of criminals–a bit morbid, but intriguing.

I always end up over-analyzing my options and then only end up going to one place, but this year I want to hit at least 3. Now I just have to pick some places and actually go!

 

 

What’s Cooking Wednesday: The Thursday Edition

The forecast may say it’s going to be 50 this weekend, but I think it’s finally starting to feel like the holidays. My tree is decorated, my Christmas music station on Pandora is perfected (a good dose of Barenaked Ladies feat. Sarah McLaughlin with a touch of Pentatonix a capella), I’ve run out of counter space for cookies (I’ve successfully scaled back to only 8 kinds this year!), and I finally figured out how to light my fireplace (it’s no “chestnuts roasting” but it certainly looks cozy…and I found a candle that smells like a wood fire, so, close enough).

Getting there...

I was considering putting together a holiday gift guide, some fun suggestions for the foodies (and non-foodies) in your life, but to be quite honest I’m not feeling the consumerism this year. Most everyone in my life is getting homemade gifts (jams, pickles, mustards, gin, etc.) and I’m not really asking for anything–wooden spoons (I’m down to my last one), oven thermometer, little stuff like that. It’s nice to feel content with the things I have, and the giving part is always more fun anyways.

We are cookie baking machines!

That said, I do still love flipping through all the holiday gift catalogs, especially the food-related ones, which means I have to share this, The Haters Guide to the Williams-Sonoma Catalog. My favorite may be the mushroom log ($190 exclusive glass cloche not included). There are also editions for the 2012 and 2013 catalogs–anyone want a beehive or chicken coop (the chicken painting is extra)?

How cozy!

Dining and Drinking in Paris (Part 1)

There is no doubt that one of the biggest draws of Paris for me was the food. I mean, come on. It’s a food culture practically built on bread and cheese, two of my most favorite food groups.

As I mentioned, I went to Paris with a pretty comprehensive list of places to eat that covered everything from hole-in-the-wall falafel stands to old school French bistros to small plates and wine bars. These are just three of best places I ate during the trip (another post to come shortly with more, but I figured 1,500 words was quite enough to start with): Au Petit Versailles, an amazing cafe; Breizh Cafe for spectacular crepes and cider; and Le Baron Rouge for wine and oysters.

Petite Versaille

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What’s Cooking Wednesday: Cooking Inspiration (and a Theatrical Interlude)

I won’t bury the lede here: last weekend I met Dorie Greenspan and now I have a new cooking hero.

One of the great things about having a passion is constantly discovering how much more there is to learn. In my research on Paris (…at some point I will talk about something else, I promise) I realized how much I really don’t know about French cooking. As much as I adore Julia Child, firmly believe cheese is a food group, and really don’t think a meal is complete without bread of some kind, French cuisine has just never been something I’ve made a conscious effort to learn about. Needless to say, that’s changed.

I discovered one of my favorite shops, The Spice House, was doing a booksigning with Dorie Greenspan to promote her new cookbook on French baking, Baking Chez Moi, the weekend after my Paris trip. I knew very little about her, really, but the timing was too perfect, I had to go. The signing was great fun, not least because there was champagne and delicious little treats made by the students at the French Pastry School.

Baking Chez Moi

As soon as she started speaking, I knew it was fate–I had just finished my last macaron and she said this was the first of her 11 cookbooks in which she was finally convinced by her editor to include a recipe for the Parisian sweet (or is it American now? though I categorically object to framing it as “macarons are the new cupcake”). I anticipate a baking project…

More importantly, Dorie was everything I always hope cookbook authors will be: obviously passionate about the topic, incredibly knowledgeable, and imminently kind. To give you a clue exactly how kind, I bought two of her (not insubstantial) cookbooks before the event in hopes she’d be willing to sign both. Not only was she happy to do that (and wrote the sweetest custom inscription when I told her I just got back from my first trip to Paris, which always earns extra points in my mind), she actually apologized for making me hold both cookbooks while I waited in line. And she was happy to take a picture with me (I need a do-over on that one).

Inscription

Dorie Greenspan

And on a totally different subject (not food- or Paris-related for a change), I went to the opening night of Drury Lane Theater’s production of Camelot last week. I love musicals and it was a nice way to stretch my “on vacation” feeling a little bit longer. The show was great fun and well sung and acted; Lancelot was a cutie; the theater was small enough that everyone had a really good view of the stage (always my struggle when buying theater tickets in downtown Chicago without cringing at the price). If you’re in the Chicago suburbs looking to see a show, check it out. (The theater comped my tickets but my thoughts on the show are my own.)

Camelot

Next post, a new recipe: a simple, beautiful French dessert!

What’s Cooking Wednesday: J’adore Paris

Oh do I have so much to share with you all. I’m currently sifting through 2,000 pictures from my four-day trip, but the short version is this: as soon as I landed yesterday, I would have happily turned around and boarded another eight hour flight for one more glass of wine, one more freshly shucked oyster, one more walk along the Seine, one more stroll through the market, one more excuse to say “bonjour.”

J’adore Paris.

eiffel

What’s Cooking Wednesday – Better Chicken Broth, Drunk Cooking, and My Favorite Restaurant

Vietnamese Chicken Soup, and My New Favorite Broth-Making Method
I caught my first cold of the season last week and before I got too far down the whiny, useless, tissue-strewn path, I made a huge pot of Vietnamese chicken soup (pho) from Smitten Kitchen. The soup itself is good (I think, I couldn’t really taste it due to the aforementioned cold) but I really loved the method for making broth. Simmer a quartered chicken plus a bunch of wings or bones for 30 minutes, take the chicken out and pick the meat off and reserve it, then add the bones (and skin if you want) back to the pot to simmer for another 2 hours, then strain. The broth was amazingly rich and the chicken meat wasn’t dried out. My test is always if it’s basically chicken jello the next day and this passed with flying colors. Delicious, delicious chicken jello.

Cure for all ills (hopefully including this stupid cold) courtesy of @smittenkitchen

My Drunk Kitchen
Have you heard of this? I don’t remember how I found it years ago, but I rediscovered it while I was home sick and watched through her entire catalog of cooking videos. Do yourself a favor and if you don’t watch any other videos, at least watch the one with Lance Bass, I about cried laughing. (And just in case the name of the series doesn’t suggest it, don’t watch if you’re easily offended by foul language or drinking in excess.)

French Method+Mexican Flavors=Mexique
In another recent, but rather more upscale, rediscovery, I went out for dinner last week to a restaurant, Mexique, I haven’t been to in probably 5 years. When I went the first time, right after they were named one of the best new restaurants in Chicago, it was one of the best experiences I’ve had–food to wine suggestions to service (the chef, Carlos Gaytan, came out to ask our table how everything was and I saw him check in with each table in the restaurant).

I hadn’t been back in part because I was worried it wouldn’t live up to my first meal, but on a whim I went a few weekends ago and everything was as excellent as I remembered and the chef still came to every table. Now, as much as love food, I am sorely out of touch with the goings-on of the Chicago restaurant scene, which probably explains how I missed that the chef just placed fourth on Top Chef or that the restaurant was recently awarded a Michelin star–all after being on the verge of closing 2 years ago. I found this all out after the fact, but this was a great article about the restaurant’s ups and downs.

What’s Cooking Wednesday: Leek Butter, Fancy Melty Cheese, and New (Easier) Canning Rules

Leek Butter, aka The Best Thing Ever
If you find yourself with an overabundance of leeks this time of year, I beg you to try this: slice and rinse leeks to remove any dirt or grit. In a big pot over medium low heat, melt a good hunk of butter (I used about 1/2 a stick for four monster-sized leeks). Add leeks, stir to coat with the butter, and add a good pinch of salt. Cover and cook the leeks, stirring occasionally, until they’re very soft and let off much of their liquid. Uncover, turn the heat up slightly and continue stirring occasionally until all the liquid has cooked off and they are just starting to brown and stick to the bottom of the pot. Turn off the heat, cool, and store in the fridge or freezer.

I’ve been eating through this like it’s going out of style. I’ve been spreading it on egg sandwiches, grilled cheese, and can’t wait to stir it into soups, pasta, or just eat it with a spoon. It’s the simplest, most delicious thing I’ve eaten so far this fall and I can’t get enough.

Speaking of Grilled Cheese…
I will never, ever get around to doing this but oh I would love fancy cheese that melts perfectly like good old American cheese in its plastic wrappers.

New Streamlined Canning Process
Most of canning season is over, with the exception of apples and cranberries, but it’s still worth noting that the guidelines have changed to make things a little easier and less intimidating. Here’s the detailed information about the change but the short version is that you don’t have to simmer the lids in water and you don’t have to pre-sterilize the jars as long as the recipe you’re making calls for at least 10 minutes of processing.

I think both of these things make sense, and honestly, I’ve been doing both since I got comfortable with the process. I wash my lids with soap and set them in a bowl of water I ladle out of my canning pot when it starts simmering (one less pot on my stove) and I put my jars in the pot while it heats up just so everything is close to the same temperature (less chance of shock and a cracked jar that way).

I have no pictures of any of the above, but this seems empty without a picture so enjoy this sunset from my porch earlier this summer.

Crazy storms mean very cool sunsets #Chicago #edgewater #sunset #summerinthecity #summerstorms #summer #nofilter #lovemyporchview

What’s Cooking Wednesdays – Drunken Plums, Food Swaps, and the City of Light

In an effort to share a bit more often, I’m starting a weekly post of random food-ish related things going on: recipes I’m trying (or want to try), things I’ve learned, community goings-on, whatever’s interesting at the moment. With that said…

Gin and Juice
Did you know sloe gin is actually gin flavored with the juice of a fruit called a sloe? And sloes are related to plums? I discovered that after I went a little overboard at the sight of damson plums at the market. Damsons were my favorite new fruit discovery from the market last fall; tiny, dark purple plums that are terrible for eating out of hand but make the most amazing jam, possibly tied with the strawberry cranberry jam as my favorite.

Random Wednesday night projects: my most favorite jam (damson plum), attempting damson gin (apparently damsons are related to sloes, as in sloe gin), and the last 3 quarts of tomatoes #canning #gin #jam #puttingup #preserves #foodinjars #drinksinjars #eve

Anyways, I have two quart jars of of gin, sugar, and half-smashed damsons hanging out in my liquor cabinet waiting until Christmas, so we’ll see how this goes. I followed instructions from Nigel Slater and used 1/2 pound of plums, 1/2 cup sugar, and 2 cups of gin. If nothing else, the ruby red color is gorgeous.

New Home for Chicago Food Swaps
This past weekend I went to the first Chicago Food Swap at the new Fearless Food Kitchen and I can’t even say how excited I am about this space. There’s tons of natural light (hello giant skylight), the equipment and setup are great, it’s huge. I can’t wait to start taking classes at the Kitchen and possibly dabbling in teaching a class or two–they’re going to have a cool program called Taste Tests for community members to teach what they know.
New home of the Chicago Food Swap

For the swap I made jam tarts (adapted from Deb at Smitten Kitchen, who adapted her version from David Lobovitz) and a variation of one of my favorite fall chilis with black beans and orange zest (I added sweet potatoes and some different spices). I’m hoping to share my versions of both of these recipes soon as they both tasted and looked fantastic.

My goodies

Oui, Paris!
Not to bury the lede, but I’m going to Paris! For a few glorious days this fall, I’ll be indulging in all manner of treats (food and otherwise) and I. Cannot. Wait. I already have a list a mile long of places I want to check out, websites and books to read (The Greater Journey was nearly 600 pages of wonderful that I plowed through in a week), but I’m trying to rein in my planner side and remember to just go with the flow. I am practicing my macaron-eating though.

Very important to practice before the real thing #macaron #paris

End of summer garden update

Summer officially ends in a few hours, which made me realize I haven’t really talked about my garden since June. I’m calling this my “practice year”–for having no clue what I was doing, my garden did pretty well in its first year. Next year I’ll remember to fertilize much more often, be a little more on top of the weeds, and not be afraid to thin things out. The folks at Peterson Garden Project also deserve a lot of thanks for answering a ton of questions and saving my tomatoes!

How did your garden do?

June garden in full swing
First real slicing tomato
Wall of peas
Purple tomatillos

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