Mid-July Busy-ness

It’s an unfortunate coincidence that the months I have the most to talk about–farmers markets and grilling and all the cooking, really, and gardens and, lately, traveling every which way–also happen to be the same months that I have the least amount of time to write about any of said things because I’m…well, farmers market-ing and grilling and cooking and gardening and traveling (though that last one is the worst excuse as I keep telling myself Internet-free plane time is the best time for writing. Too bad it’s also great time for watching movies, reading a book, or staring out the window).

Which is to say, a lot’s been going on since I last posted, eek, nearly a month ago: infusing booze with flowers, making my first slow-smoked ribs, keeping my garden alive and (mostly) thriving, spending a week in England. You know, little stuff like that. Plus I still want to share my trip to Barcelona and a supremely foodie trip to Boston (including the best restaurant I’ve eaten at in recent memory and the inspiration for this summer’s quest to perfect pizza on the grill).

It’s all coming though! It may be with fewer, less pretty pictures, maybe slightly less cohesive words, but perfection is the enemy of the good, or, at least for me lately, the enemy of posting anything at all.

In the meantime, have a picture of my new obsession that might actually be better than my long-time favorite.

The BEST ribs

Spice-Rubbed Beer-Steamed Wood-Smoked Chicken

Usually when I share a recipe, I try to photograph important steps along the way or some part of the process that strikes me as particularly pretty. Trust me when I say this is the only picture of this recipe you need:

Golden brown and delicious

If you’re looking for the summer equivalent of fall and winter’s roast chicken, like smoked things, and have some beer hanging around, make this. This was one of those random dinner experiments that turned out miles beyond what I had hoped for. I was trying to make beer-can chicken, but my grill lid isn’t high enough to have the chicken stand up, so…I took the beer out of the can and put it under the chicken instead. And figured, what the heck, soak some wood chips in the beer while I’m at it. It looked gorgeous and tasted even better. I may have snuck a wing off this guy while I waited for my asparagus to grill.

I’ve made this with two different spice mixtures (a BBQ rub and a jerk spice rub) and two different kinds of beer (honestly just ones that have been kicking around my kitchen for far long–yes, I’m also that mythical person who has leftover wine). I’m planning to try this with cider next time and a spice blend like baharat or zatar. There are pretty much infinite variations and it can be as simple or as adventurous as you like. For a simple summer dinner (and great leftovers) with minimal prep, though, this cannot be beat.

Spice-Rubbed Beer-Steamed Wood-Smoked Chicken Continue reading

June in the Garden

I’ve mentioned my garden a few times this spring, but I think it’s finally settled (and green) enough to share a few pictures and talk about my plans this year (which, if they’re anything like last year, lasted all of a month before I realized my garden had its own plan).


Here’s what came back from last year:

  • Chives (obviously), plus a few lonely garlic chives
  • Borage (I’m kind of afraid of this plant right now. I think it might grow legs and prowl the streets at night looking for small animals to eat. But the flowers are pretty and it’s good in a Pimm’s Cup!)
  • A few lettuce that I neglected for so long last summer that they actually went to seed and grew new lettuces.
  • Two strawberry plants. I had five last year, everyone says they’re nearly impossible to kill, other gardeners’ plots are completely overtaken with them. I killed more than half of mine. At least my chives came back?

Here’s what I planted as baby plants, a mix of stuff from the Peterson Garden Project sale, some vendors at the farmers market, and a local garden center.

  • Tomatoes. Oh, do I have tomatoes. Let’s see:
  • Tomatillos, purple and yellow (so excited for both of these!!)
  • Ground cherries
  • Peppers: Carmen (sweet), Poblano (mild), Maule’s Red Hot (spicy)
  • Dinosaur kale
  • Strawberries. I give up on doing strawberries in my garden, but they’ll be nice as a hanging basket! I’ll stick with stocking up at the farmers market and just appreciate the novelty of plucking one or two while I’m enjoying the sunset view from my porch.
  • All the herbs. In addition to two kinds of chives, I have oregano, parsley, rosemary, basil (regular and Thai, if the Thai one survives falling over in the car and breaking off most of its stem), bay, thyme, cilantro, epazote, lemon verbena, pineapple mint, and strawberry mint. The mints, epazote, and bay are all in pots on my porch, and the rest were big enough that I split them and have some in my garden to get big and bushy and some on my porch for quick access.

May 24, post planting June 7, getting greener And this is what I’m planting from seed:

  • Snap peas
  • Mixed lettuce, half the amount I planted last year
  • Mixed chard
  • Mixed radishes, mostly French Breakfast, a few purple, and some others that looked interesting. Watermelon radishes are getting planted in fall, a mistake I realized too late last year.
  • Dragon Tongue beans, which I’m inordinately excited about. They grew so fast!
  • Green beans.
  • Cucumber…maybe. I might do this in a pot on my porch this year, since I only want little cucumbers and can let them vine up my porch railings.

All the herbs. And tomatoes.

Considering all the rain we’ve been getting, everything is growing along quite happily (except some things that are none too happy with all the water. Or the sudden cold snap. I’m looking at you, tomatillos, basil, and rosemary. And I think my rosemary has powdery mildew. Boo.).

Chive-Cheddar Biscuits

Now that the flowers of my chives are put to work, on to more immediate gratification–biscuits.

Cheesy, chive-y layers Chive bouquet

I will eat biscuits (really, bread in any form) with anything and love them flavored with everything. For my overload of chives, I finely chopped a good handful of the chives I cut back along with two big handfuls of grated cheddar cheese and a few of the chive flowers for good measure, the hard blossom end plucked off and the flower sprinkled in. They were spectacular, perfect under a layer of spinach and an over-easy egg.

Curlicue of cheese Chopped chivesand an errant blossom Layers of color Biscuitt dough

With all the herbs I’ve planted, herb biscuits are going to be a great option to stash in the freezer for any future biscuit emergencies (…don’t look at me like that, that’s a real thing). I plan on doing at least one sweet biscuit with the lemon verbena (doesn’t that sound good as the base for a strawberry shortcake?) and another cheesy variation with the thyme (gruyere, perhaps?). Rosemary and black pepper biscuits would be amazing along side lemon chicken.

Baked biscuitChive bouquet

Chive Biscuits Continue reading

Chive Blossom Vinegar

I’m going to be ruthless with my garden this year. One of my biggest mistakes last year was hesitating to cut back and thin out a lot of what I planted. It felt so heartless to pluck out perfectly good little lettuces (they just want to live up to their full lettuce-y potential!) or hack off the better part of my basil plant. What I’m learning is that both thinning out and cutting back is better for my plants in the long run–the plants I leave get bigger, cutting them back encourages more growth.

All that is why that big bushy chive plant from three weeks ago got a major haircut and is now about 5 inches tall. It’s also why I have a jar of chive flower vinegar on my counter rapidly turning a spectacular shade of magenta and a double batch of chive biscuits in my freezer (more on those next week).

And still more chives Ready for its close-up

Vinegar will definitely be one of my go-tos for my extra herbs this summer. I’ve certainly planted enough, both in pots on my porch and in my garden, to keep pretty much everyone I know well stocked and still have enough left over to play with. I’ve got chives (of course), garlic chives, oregano, parsley, rosemary, basil, bay, thyme, cilantro, epazote, lemon verbena, pineapple mint, and strawberry mint.

Infused vinegar is about as easy as it gets. Use white vinegar in the giant industrial bottle or go fancy with white wine or champagne vinegar. Light colored vinegars are my favorite purely for aesthetics, but you can infuse red wine, apple cider, or even balsamic vinegar (finally a use for the white balsamic I keep buying from Trader Joe’s and never, ever use). Use one herb or a combination; I’m interested in making infused vinegars with basil, lemon verbena, and the mints for some great vinaigrettes this summer.

Rinsed v 2 Blossoms in a jar

Throw a few mashed berries, zest, or peppers in the mix (strawberry basil vinegar? cilantro, lime zest, and jalapeno infused vinegar added to salsa or guacamole?). The big trick is patience–you have to let it sit at least two weeks before the vinegar really well-flavored.

Mashed and infused Glowing jar of vinegar

And when I still have more herbs to use (as I know I will), chopping them up, mixing with a little bit of olive oil and freezing in ice-cube trays will be an easy way to keep them handy all year. In the meantime, I’ll try not to keep holding this up to the window to see how pretty it looks.

48 hours later. Still 12 days to go.

Chive Flower Vinegar
Continue reading

What’s Cooking Wednesday: Memorial Day Meals

Chicago can’t quite seem to commit to warm weather–we had four days of 80s and sun (perfect for working outside all last weekend at the plant sale and getting a little done in my garden), then, as soon as I get my tomatoes in the ground, down to 40s. Thankfully this weekend is supposed to be solidly beautiful, perfect for grilling, gardening, and generally being outside and eating all the almost-summer foods.

With that in mind, here’s what I’m thinking about making during the long weekend.

IcyWith rhubarb season in full swing and strawberries close behind, it was a good opportunity tonight to clean out my freezer of some of both that I haven’t gotten around to using. Easiest thing? Rhubarb-strawberry syrup. A bag each of frozen rhubarb and strawberries, enough water to cover, a few cups of sugar, zest of a lemon, simmer about 20 minutes or until it tastes good. Take off the heat and add the juice of a lemon, refrigerate. I love it with seltzer (and maybe a splash of triple sec).

Don't forget to grill a few lemons I loved this grilled chicken I made last summer, and it would go perfectly with grilled asparagus tossed with green garlic and thinly sliced French radishes, a beautiful salad, a glass of wine, and some friends on my porch. Yum.

Arugula walnut pesto on grilled pizzaAs for any leftover chicken? A batch of this pesto on a warm flatbread or spread on a toasty pita with some of the lemony grilled chicken tucked inside sounds like a perfect lunch after I finish planting my garden with tomatoes and basil and some new herbs.

Rhubarb pie And because this is the start of pie season for me, rhubarb pie is a must. I made this to celebrate my first “blogiversary” because it represented so clearly what I wanted from this blog–a new skill learned or perfected (pie crust), a new favorite ingredient discovered (rhubarb) and a recipe to bring them together. And hey, May 21 also marks happy 3 years blogging to me!

What’s Cooking Wednesday: Gardens and Bake Sales

I was so on top of my garden this time last year, I had a whole map and planned out what I was going to plant each seasons and everything. This year, I have…chives. And a few returning strawberries. That’s all I’ve managed so far, and mostly because those are the things that came back from last year.

First peek at my 2015 garden--guess i won't need to buy chives this year! #petersongardenproject

But! Next weekend is the Peterson Garden Project Plant and Bake Sale, which I used last summer as my primary source of plants for my garden. I’ll definitely be getting purple tomatillos again, and tomatoes and basil of course, but honestly not sure what else I’ll plant. I suppose I’ll leave it up to inspiration to strike. In the meantime, this weekend will be all about getting my garden ready (it needs a good layer of compost) and filling all my other assorted pots with soil.

The sale will also be fun this year as I’m helping to organize the bake sale portion of the weekend. It’s been so fun getting a sneak peek at what people are planning to bring, and I can’t wait to see all the goodies (I already have my eye on a few things I want to bring home). I haven’t decided yet what I’ll make for the sale–thinking about pop-tarts with my homemade jam, maybe carrot cupcakes, maybe cheese puffs for something savory.

How is your garden going this year?

Bella Barcelona

The past six months have felt a bit like a real-life “Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego?” minus the red hat and the international intrigue.  Which is to say, last week I spent four incredible days in (and just outside of) Barcelona.

Sant Pau Hospital View from La Sagrada Familia Paella Barceloneta Focaccia

It was a trip of firsts–first time in Spain, first time baking bread in a wood-burning oven, first time taking a cooking class in someone’s home, first time using AirBnB, first time using the tiny bit of Spanish I remembered from high school (which, as I learned, was only marginally helpful as all the signs are in, and many people speak, Catalan). Most significantly for me, though, it was the first trip I’ve done completely by myself, with no agenda or priorities other than my own. It was a transformative experience, one I’m still processing, but that I could not be more grateful to have had.

I’m still organizing my thoughts (and nearly 2,000 photos), but more, so much more–all the amazing people I met, the beautiful sights, the food (oh, the food!)–to come soon. Bon dia!

Sagrada Familia Barcelona museumMuseum fountain Bread LunchBarcelona Cathedral Sagrada Familia

Vive la Madeleine

What dessert or sweet treat defines Paris? The internet is littered with lists, debates rage, and more often than not, the macaron is crowned king (or queen, perhaps not an enviable role given Paris’ history). I would argue the madeleine, quietly observing from the wings, deserves its moment to shine.

A little bump

Delicious and beautiful and delicate as they are, macarons are also known for their fussiness and fanciness; they have a notorious reputation for tempermentality should you take on the challenge of making them yourself. Madeleines are confident in their simplicity, needing nothing more than a dusting of powdered sugar or basic sugar glaze.

Madeleine prep Lemon sugar

Madeleines, like Paris, have a bit of je ne sais quoi about them, just enough to make things interesting, but not intimidating if approached with the right attitude. Madeleines are, in fact, very approachable and not particularly complicated–you probably have every ingredient in your cupboard or fridge.

But they require a bit of dedication and a dedicated pan (madelelines are not madeleines if they’re baked in cupcake tins), a little patience, and some home-cook magic to create their iconic little bump. Madeleines also will not wait for you; once baked, their window of perfection is short, and it’s really best to cede to their schedule for the best experience–you’ll really be glad you did.

Whisk until right before your arm falls off Adding butter

The buttery, lemony, sweet little cakes themselves are pillow-soft but sturdy enough to stand up to a dunk in a cup of tea (memorably so, if Marcel Proust is any authority). If you look at a macaron sideways, its delicate shell might crack and crumble. The madeleines traditional shell shape is their one nod to decoration, but even that is relatively simple by necessity–too intricate and the detail is lost or they stick to the pan.

Flour-y shells Post rest

On the other hand, maybe the madeleine is best left out of the spotlight to be enjoyed by those who know what to look for. Maybe it doesn’t need a chain of ultra-high-end stores, fancy boxes, or a cult following, but just a pretty little plate and a pot of tea at a beat-up wooden table surrounded by friends and good conversation. Sounds like perfection to me.

Odd man outPerfect petite madeleines

And simply because no discussion of the madeleine would be complete without it:

No sooner had the warm liquid mixed with the crumbs touched my palate than a shudder ran through me and I stopped, intent upon the extraordinary thing that was happening to me. An exquisite pleasure had invaded my senses, something isolated, detached, with no suggestion of its origin. And at once the vicissitudes of life had become indifferent to me, its disasters innocuous, its brevity illusory – this new sensation having had on me the effect which love has of filling me with a precious essence; or rather this essence was not in me it was me. … Whence did it come? What did it mean? How could I seize and apprehend it? … And suddenly the memory revealed itself. The taste was that of the little piece of madeleine which on Sunday mornings at Combray (because on those mornings I did not go out before mass), when I went to say good morning to her in her bedroom, my aunt Léonie used to give me, dipping it first in her own cup of tea or tisane. The sight of the little madeleine had recalled nothing to my mind before I tasted it. And all from my cup of tea.

Madeleines Continue reading

What’s Cooking Wednesday: On the Grill

On the spectrum of grills and grilling, this is how I view things:

Charcoal grill > Any grill > No grill


A few years ago, I moved into my first apartment with a porch and my first must-do was learn how to grill. Happily, I got a little cast iron Lodge hibachi grill as a housewarming gift (you know what’s really smart? giving a person who likes to cook stuff to cook with because they will often use it to cook for you).

Salad on the grill Grilling

For four years, I used the hell out of that thing. It’s just the right size to cook for one or two people, but I easily had enough space to grill a whole pizza or a few burgers when I needed to. It was fast to heat up, holds just enough charcoal for one meal (with enough left over to melt a few marshmallows), and took briquette (the kind most grocery stores sell in summer) and lump (the kind that looks like chunks of burnt wood) charcoal. I can guarantee there were weeks in summer I did not touch my stove in favor of cooking on my porch (yes, breakfast too–do you know how good grilled bacon is?).

As much as I love that grill, it has a few drawbacks. The lack of a lid is the biggest one, making it a challenge to cook larger pieces of meat for longer periods of time. Foil or a pot lid worked to melt cheese on a burger, but not so well for cooking, say, a whole chicken, or smoking anything. A little Weber or tabletop/tailgating grill would have solved this, but I really like how the cast iron maintained heat. That’s why my housewarming gift to myself with my new place (after I made sure there were no rules about grilling, and yes, being able to grill was one of my “must-haves” when I was looking to buy) was a small ceramic grill, a Kamado Joe Jr.

My baby

I love my new baby for a lot of reasons but it came with a bit of a learning curve. The biggest selling point for me: it’s easy to get temperatures really low (180º F), really high (900º F), and everything in between and hold that temperature steady for a very long time–the whole thing is essentially a brick oven with grill grates. The lid and the steady temperatures also mean I can cook larger things like chicken; smoke salmon, or even bake (some people get excited about a pulled pork on the grill, I’m excited about baking cobbler. Ok, and the pork too.).

Perfect way to end a warm spring day, strawberry rhubarb cobbler from #americastestkitchen cooked on my #kamadojoe. #atkgrams #grilling #bringonspring

Compared to my cast iron grill, the ceramic needs a little more attention and takes a little longer to get the hang of. It’s slower to heat up than my cast iron, and only uses lump charcoal. Also, with the cast iron I could see my food as it cooked and so was quicker to figure out how much charcoal to use, how to set my hot and cool spots, when to turn or otherwise fuss with the food. With the ceramic, the cooking is mostly hidden under the lid, so I’ve had to learn a bit more by trial and error (and a few overdone burgers). But as I figure it out, I realize how much I will be able do–baking pizzas at near-professional pizza-oven temperatures and smoking my own bacon, for instance.

Still smoking "Sasquatched" Don't forget to grill a few lemons

The difference between my two grills is essentially the difference between having a stovetop and having a full stove with an oven. I can cook nearly everything with just the first, but having the flexibility of the second gives me so many more options that it’s worth dealing with the learning curve.

If I had a porch big enough to have both grills out at the same time, I would, but for now I’m defaulting to my ceramic. My next place though…both grills.