What’s Cooking Wednesday: Almost Thanksgiving!

Just over a week to Thanksgiving! It’s tied with the 4th of July as my favorite food/friends/family holiday. While I don’t have any turkey (or mashed potato or stuffing) recipes to suggest for anyone’s feast, I thought it would be fun to see what I could contribute to the Thanksgiving table.

Let’s start with dessert (as all meals should, really). Might I suggest something slightly different along side the apple and pumpkin pie? How about a plum pie spiced with orange, brandy, ginger, cinnamon and a crunchy, crumbly, nutty topping? Yum.

Plum crumble pie

Cranberries? I have two options, both of which can be done in advance. Option one is equally good accompanying a perfect slice of turkey as it is stirred into a bowl of hot oatmeal on a cold morning–a fantastic conserve of cranberries and oranges, nuts and apricots. You can water-bath process it if you feel like it, or just store in the fridge.

Jammy

Option two is for the slightly more adventurous: pickled spiced cranberries. The berries themselves are delicious, sweet and tart and an excellent complement to the richness of a Thanksgiving meal, but the syrup is equally amazing mixed with some seltzer (…and possibly a little vodka or gin).

Pickled cranberries

Need something to nibble on with said drink? These spiced candied nuts work nicely and conveniently are also delicious (with the pickled cranberries) on a post-Thanksgiving salad with leftover sweet potatoes and goat cheese.

Candied spiced walnuts

And finally, since I feel no meal is complete without bread in some way, shape, or form, cornmeal biscuits with green onion and black pepper. If these are a bit too casual for your dinner table, they do make for a particularly delicious turkey sandwich.

Flaky biscuits, topped with salt and pepper

What are you planning for your Thanksgiving meal (or the leftovers, which are obviously the second best part of the holiday)?

 

Recipes with roots

The more I discover about food, the more I find that the dishes I’m drawn to are the ones with history, with deep roots in the land and the people who live on it. Usually these are not particularly complicated recipes, nor do they call for particularly fancy ingredients or preparations. I love the infinite variety that comes from the simplest ingredients–flour, sugar, butter, eggs, salt, lemon, yeast–and how each family, town, country, culture can make something that is completely and uniquely theirs.

Golden brown and delicious

Of the (many) food-related souvenirs I brought home from Paris, the absolutely beautiful–in picture and word–cookbook A Kitchen in France may be one of my favorites. I stumbled on Mimi Thorisson’s blog, Manger, a few years ago but somehow managed to forget about it until I was flipping through her newly published first book in a tiny cramped aisle of Shakespeare & Co. The pictures of her food, home, and the Medoc countryside are stunning; the stories are the stuff of my daydreams. Most important of all, though, are the recipes.

Six basic ingredients
Butter, sugar, egg, lemon

The recipes in this book are everything I mentioned at the beginning of this post. They’re recipes with roots; roots either in a particular area of France, in Mimi’s family or her neighbors’ history, in a unique local ingredient, in a particular season. Some are incredibly simple, like the recipe below, some with a few more steps, like the bouillabaisse, but what I love about all of them is that it’s easy to feel their history.

Add flour
Risen
Sticky dough

I don’t think it was coincidence that flipping through this book over the course of a week, it kept falling open to this particular recipe. I took it as a sign and as soon as I started mixing the ingredients together, I had an immediate feeling of being home. I knew this smell, the rich combination of butter, sugar, lemon, yeast. I don’t even know exactly what recipe this reminded me of (maybe my grandma’s lemon cream cheese swirls?), but it struck something deep and nostalgic.

There’s nothing particularly local or seasonal about this recipe–it is, after all, only six of the most basic ingredients in baking–but it’s easy to feel the history in it, from when butter and sugar were special treats because they were rare (according to the cookbook, this is a medieval recipe from the town of Pérouges) to when butter and sugar are special treats because they’re a welcome break from multi-syllabic preservatives.

Beyond that, it’s easy and just tastes really, really good–it’s hard to go wrong with warm lemony, buttery brioche dough topped with melted butter and slightly crunchy caramelized sugar. It’s impossible to go wrong actually, which is why you should make this immediately.

Pinch up the edges
Sugared
One delicious slice

Galette Pérougienne (Lemon Sugar Bread) Continue reading

What’s Cooking Wednesday: Cooking Inspiration (and a Theatrical Interlude)

I won’t bury the lede here: last weekend I met Dorie Greenspan and now I have a new cooking hero.

One of the great things about having a passion is constantly discovering how much more there is to learn. In my research on Paris (…at some point I will talk about something else, I promise) I realized how much I really don’t know about French cooking. As much as I adore Julia Child, firmly believe cheese is a food group, and really don’t think a meal is complete without bread of some kind, French cuisine has just never been something I’ve made a conscious effort to learn about. Needless to say, that’s changed.

I discovered one of my favorite shops, The Spice House, was doing a booksigning with Dorie Greenspan to promote her new cookbook on French baking, Baking Chez Moi, the weekend after my Paris trip. I knew very little about her, really, but the timing was too perfect, I had to go. The signing was great fun, not least because there was champagne and delicious little treats made by the students at the French Pastry School.

Baking Chez Moi

As soon as she started speaking, I knew it was fate–I had just finished my last macaron and she said this was the first of her 11 cookbooks in which she was finally convinced by her editor to include a recipe for the Parisian sweet (or is it American now? though I categorically object to framing it as “macarons are the new cupcake”). I anticipate a baking project…

More importantly, Dorie was everything I always hope cookbook authors will be: obviously passionate about the topic, incredibly knowledgeable, and imminently kind. To give you a clue exactly how kind, I bought two of her (not insubstantial) cookbooks before the event in hopes she’d be willing to sign both. Not only was she happy to do that (and wrote the sweetest custom inscription when I told her I just got back from my first trip to Paris, which always earns extra points in my mind), she actually apologized for making me hold both cookbooks while I waited in line. And she was happy to take a picture with me (I need a do-over on that one).

Inscription

Dorie Greenspan

And on a totally different subject (not food- or Paris-related for a change), I went to the opening night of Drury Lane Theater’s production of Camelot last week. I love musicals and it was a nice way to stretch my “on vacation” feeling a little bit longer. The show was great fun and well sung and acted; Lancelot was a cutie; the theater was small enough that everyone had a really good view of the stage (always my struggle when buying theater tickets in downtown Chicago without cringing at the price). If you’re in the Chicago suburbs looking to see a show, check it out. (The theater comped my tickets but my thoughts on the show are my own.)

Camelot

Next post, a new recipe: a simple, beautiful French dessert!

What’s Cooking Wednesday: J’adore Paris

Oh do I have so much to share with you all. I’m currently sifting through 2,000 pictures from my four-day trip, but the short version is this: as soon as I landed yesterday, I would have happily turned around and boarded another eight hour flight for one more glass of wine, one more freshly shucked oyster, one more walk along the Seine, one more stroll through the market, one more excuse to say “bonjour.”

J’adore Paris.

eiffel

What’s Cooking Wednesday: Spring Rolls!

Technically this was what was cooking on Tuesday, but let’s not nitpick. Last night I went to my first class at the new Fearless Food Kitchen on making one of my favorite dishes on earth, fresh Vietnamese spring rolls. It was fantastic!

Shrimp and tofu was my favorite combination

If you ever had Vietnamese spring rolls, you know they bear little resemblance to the deep fried versions at Chinese restaurants. These delicious bites are about as fresh as it gets: delicate (but sturdier than you’d think) rice paper wrappers stuffed with fresh herbs and vegetables, noodles, plus shrimp, pork, and/or tofu and dipped in a sweet, salty, peanut-y sauce. They’re also great for using up whatever bits and pieces you have in the fridge.

The group was small, maybe eight people–perfect for chatting and asking our teacher plenty of questions. I’ve made these rolls before but what I loved about the class was learning the little tips that only someone who’s been making them for decades knows–things like what order to layer the ingredients (protein on the bottom so it looks pretty when it’s done, followed by noodles, vegetables, herbs, then lettuce), how to roll them to keep all the good stuff inside and look pretty too. She even taught us that you could make a simple light soup from the broth made after cooking the shrimp and pork to serve with the rolls.

Great class in a beautiful space!

After our lovely instructor gave us a spring roll assembly demo, we all got to make as many rolls as we liked with our favorite mix of ingredients. It was great fun to try different variations and especially to see what other people were making. The only think I’m bummed about is that I missed how to make the dipping sauce! I know it involves peanut butter and possibly hoisin. I hope someone in the class reads this and shares what I missed, it’s probably my hands-down favorite part of eating spring rolls.

Dipping the rice paper wrappers Beautiful!

If you’re looking for a fun way to spend an evening, try out one of the Fearless Food Kitchen classes (and class volunteers get to take the class for free in exchange for some help prepping and cleaning up–totally worth it in my opinion). They have a class tonight on making seasonal salads that sounds awesome and I’ve heard great things about the juicing and smoothie classes too.

Recipe to come soon!

What’s Cooking Wednesday: Grape Jam and Cooking Classes

You’re Turning Violet, Violet!
That’s how I felt this weekend as I made a veritable vat of grape jam, my fingers, mouth, and shirt (I have at least three aprons, do I ever wear any of them? of course not) almost immediately stained various shades of purple. I didn’t make grape jam last year–I probably got too busy canning 8 million jars of tomatoes–but now that I have a food mill, it’s infinitely easier than trying to press the grapes through a strainer or pick out the seeds by hand. Hence, a vat of jam.

Handful of grapes
Basket of Concord

I made plain grape, grape-Damson plum (I had a few cups of un-canned jam in my fridge from my last jam-fest featuring my favorite plums), and a batch of the grape-plum batch flavored with a few pieces of orange zest and a sprig of rosemary from my garden. Next time I’ll let these infuse longer, the flavor is very subtle but I can tell it’s a nice combination.

I love grape jam in part because when it’s done, it looks like “real” jam–it sets and spreads like you think jam should. It doesn’t hurt that the color is gorgeous and my home still smells like grapes. This is the part of fall that I love.

Grape jam in the making

Fearless Cooking at the Fearless Kitchen
I mentioned a few weeks ago that the new space for the Peterson Garden Project, the Fearless Food Kitchen, is open (and gorgeous) and last week their classes started up.  I’m really excited to see the offerings so far–canning, pickling, seasonal salads, South Indian cuisine–but the series I’m most interested in is the Taste Test series. These are classes taught by anyone in the community on a cooking topic of their choice, no teaching experience required, and they’re only $25.

There’s a class on making Vietnamese spring rolls, one of my favorite dishes ever (and not just because I end up eating the dipping sauce with a spoon), plus classes on cooking with kids, how to eat healthy, delicious meals when dealing with food restrictions–I expect the variety of these classes to be really interesting. If you’re looking for an inexpensive cooking class, check them out, they’re doing a “Buy one, bring a friend for free” discount right now on Facebook too; they’re also looking for volunteers to help with the classes (bonus–you get to take the class for free).

I’m hoping to figure out a topic and propose a class soon (maybe pie crust-making? too ambitious for my first time teaching anything food-related?). What kind of cooking class would you be interested in taking?

New home of the Chicago Food Swap

What’s Cooking Wednesday – Better Chicken Broth, Drunk Cooking, and My Favorite Restaurant

Vietnamese Chicken Soup, and My New Favorite Broth-Making Method
I caught my first cold of the season last week and before I got too far down the whiny, useless, tissue-strewn path, I made a huge pot of Vietnamese chicken soup (pho) from Smitten Kitchen. The soup itself is good (I think, I couldn’t really taste it due to the aforementioned cold) but I really loved the method for making broth. Simmer a quartered chicken plus a bunch of wings or bones for 30 minutes, take the chicken out and pick the meat off and reserve it, then add the bones (and skin if you want) back to the pot to simmer for another 2 hours, then strain. The broth was amazingly rich and the chicken meat wasn’t dried out. My test is always if it’s basically chicken jello the next day and this passed with flying colors. Delicious, delicious chicken jello.

Cure for all ills (hopefully including this stupid cold) courtesy of @smittenkitchen

My Drunk Kitchen
Have you heard of this? I don’t remember how I found it years ago, but I rediscovered it while I was home sick and watched through her entire catalog of cooking videos. Do yourself a favor and if you don’t watch any other videos, at least watch the one with Lance Bass, I about cried laughing. (And just in case the name of the series doesn’t suggest it, don’t watch if you’re easily offended by foul language or drinking in excess.)

French Method+Mexican Flavors=Mexique
In another recent, but rather more upscale, rediscovery, I went out for dinner last week to a restaurant, Mexique, I haven’t been to in probably 5 years. When I went the first time, right after they were named one of the best new restaurants in Chicago, it was one of the best experiences I’ve had–food to wine suggestions to service (the chef, Carlos Gaytan, came out to ask our table how everything was and I saw him check in with each table in the restaurant).

I hadn’t been back in part because I was worried it wouldn’t live up to my first meal, but on a whim I went a few weekends ago and everything was as excellent as I remembered and the chef still came to every table. Now, as much as love food, I am sorely out of touch with the goings-on of the Chicago restaurant scene, which probably explains how I missed that the chef just placed fourth on Top Chef or that the restaurant was recently awarded a Michelin star–all after being on the verge of closing 2 years ago. I found this all out after the fact, but this was a great article about the restaurant’s ups and downs.

Pear and ginger muffins

I had the best of intentions last week, yet I still found myself with a half dozen pears sitting on my counter, too far gone for eating out of hand. That, of course, didn’t stop me from buying more pears at the market this past weekend. With an over-abundance of fruit and a decidedly fall chill in the air, it seemed as good an excuse as any for a little baking project.

Moody muffin

It would make a better story if this recipe came about after deep contemplation of a perfect bag of golden, freckled pears plucked from a tree with branches positively aching, overloaded with fruit; if I told you how the warming spice of ginger speaks to the new fall season and complements and contrasts the pear’s sweet flower smell. Or if I waxed poetic about the crisp fall leaves flying around me in eddies and waves of yellows, oranges, reds, purples, their sound the autumn equivalent of waves on the beach, while the sun’s angled rays stretches and pulls shadows across the ground.

Freckled pears

Truth? I stared at the pears on my counter on Sunday morning and had this conversation with myself: “These poor pears are not going to last a single day longer. You know, it’s been entirely too long since I made muffins. I wonder how pear muffins would be. And pears go so well with ginger and hey, don’t I have a bag of ginger bits somewhere? I bet if I mashed up the soft pears I could just add them to the liquid ingredients. Good enough, let’s try this.”

Streusel-ed

Like I said, the first version makes the better story, but sometimes the muffin is all you need.

Pear Ginger Muffins Continue reading

What’s Cooking Wednesday: Leek Butter, Fancy Melty Cheese, and New (Easier) Canning Rules

Leek Butter, aka The Best Thing Ever
If you find yourself with an overabundance of leeks this time of year, I beg you to try this: slice and rinse leeks to remove any dirt or grit. In a big pot over medium low heat, melt a good hunk of butter (I used about 1/2 a stick for four monster-sized leeks). Add leeks, stir to coat with the butter, and add a good pinch of salt. Cover and cook the leeks, stirring occasionally, until they’re very soft and let off much of their liquid. Uncover, turn the heat up slightly and continue stirring occasionally until all the liquid has cooked off and they are just starting to brown and stick to the bottom of the pot. Turn off the heat, cool, and store in the fridge or freezer.

I’ve been eating through this like it’s going out of style. I’ve been spreading it on egg sandwiches, grilled cheese, and can’t wait to stir it into soups, pasta, or just eat it with a spoon. It’s the simplest, most delicious thing I’ve eaten so far this fall and I can’t get enough.

Speaking of Grilled Cheese…
I will never, ever get around to doing this but oh I would love fancy cheese that melts perfectly like good old American cheese in its plastic wrappers.

New Streamlined Canning Process
Most of canning season is over, with the exception of apples and cranberries, but it’s still worth noting that the guidelines have changed to make things a little easier and less intimidating. Here’s the detailed information about the change but the short version is that you don’t have to simmer the lids in water and you don’t have to pre-sterilize the jars as long as the recipe you’re making calls for at least 10 minutes of processing.

I think both of these things make sense, and honestly, I’ve been doing both since I got comfortable with the process. I wash my lids with soap and set them in a bowl of water I ladle out of my canning pot when it starts simmering (one less pot on my stove) and I put my jars in the pot while it heats up just so everything is close to the same temperature (less chance of shock and a cracked jar that way).

I have no pictures of any of the above, but this seems empty without a picture so enjoy this sunset from my porch earlier this summer.

Crazy storms mean very cool sunsets #Chicago #edgewater #sunset #summerinthecity #summerstorms #summer #nofilter #lovemyporchview